Tag: Ethics In Scholarly Communication

Ethics in research: how to improve the integrity of scientists in their work

Scientific activity as a social enterprise must maintain its credibility. The Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines are presented as a recent and innovative initiative for scientific journals, and as one of the ways to guard this social value. Read More →

Editorial ethics – the geography of plagiarism

A recent study published in PNAS on 757,000 arXiv.org documents about the reuse of text (text overlap) shows that this practice is more common in some countries than others, but the results seem to show that the authors who extensively copy texts from others are also the less cited. Read More →

Editorial ethics: fraudulent arbitration

In recent months there have been a significant amount of retractions of scientific papers due to fraudulent arbitration processes. Apparently “paper mills” are appearing on the market that offer researchers, for a price, the possibility that their name appear in an article in a high Impact Factor journal (although not being the author). Read More →

Science and life: Interview – Tribute to Dr. Greene

Completing 80 years of life, Dr. Greene, professor, scientist and editor for more than 30 years awards us by sharing his knowledge and experience on issues that affect scholarly communication of Brazil in an interview given to the SciELO team. From an early age his interests were linked to research; his initial training was in Chemistry, followed later by Cell Biology. We encourage readers to share this experience. Read More →

The Rise of China – a special issue of the Revista Brasileira de Politíca Internacional

Over the past few years, the Revista Brasileira de Politíca Internacional – RBPI has published a number of special issues dealing with burning issues in contemporary international politics, and those with special relevance for Brazil. These special issues are always published in English, and consist of content which has been brought together as a result of calls for international papers, and which have, as invited editors, specialists in the topics being discussed. The special issue for 2014 entitled “China rising – strategies and tactics of China’s growing presence in the world” (special issue – Vol. 57), available in the SciELO Brazil Collection, is published entirely in English and brings together 15 previously unpublished articles dealing with the complex rise of that country to the top level of international structures. Read More →

Study proposes a taxonomy of motives to cite articles in scientific publications

Article examines the activity of citing publications during the process of writing a scientific paper. The suggested model consists of four main categories – Arguments, Social Alignment, Mercantile Alignment and Data – plus subcategories. The authors argue that the complexities of citation practice show how little can be assumed about the real reasons for citing an article by analyzing the final paper. The study has an impact mainly in attributing relevance to articles based solely on citations, and therefore, on journal and researcher assessment. Read More →

The challenges of retraction: cleaning up the literature might be difficult

There is consensus that misconduct in academic publications should be remedied as soon as possible. However, there are a number of implications – ethical, moral, legal and those related to the reputation of the journals and researchers in the retraction process – that turn the process into a complex one which can often become unworkable. Read More →

Retraction of scientific works and pseudoscience

Is the growing number of scientific retractions necessarily due to the fruits of pseudoscience? Productive reflection on the subject leads us to the need to recognize the current demands of the scientific system for researchers, conflicts of interests at stake and that science is produced by fallible human beings with their own moral values ​​. Globalization, while supporting misconduct, strengthens social control. Increased retraction of papers is a necessary response of the social control to what some authors refer to as “pseudoscience”. Read More →

Editorial ethics – good and bad scientific practices

III BRISPE: Brazilian Meeting on Research Integrity, Science and Publication Ethics, sponsored by FAPESP, was the third event held in Brazil with the objective to promote institutional policies and practices of ethical research integrity and responsible conduct. With the presence of several prestigious guests from developed countries, the education strategies to new scientists were analyzed as well as how to reduce bad practices such falsification of data, plagiarism, conflict of interests, manipulation of results, etc. Read More →

Social networks and scientific journalism: a challenge to editors

In an interview to the Blog SciELO in Perspective, Jaime L. Benchimol discusses the use of social networks and scientific journalism as a challenge to publishers. He shares his experience and presents the history and challenges of História, Ciências, Saúde – Manguinhos, pointing out: “You have to equip yourself properly and, as important as gaining the support of funding agencies, is to convince the leaders of universities and institutions that scientific journals are indispensable and are costly and complex and cannot be made by improvisations and voluntarism of some selfless”. Read More →

SciELO participates in the Global coalition supporting Creative Commons licenses to access journal articles

The STM International Association launched a series of new licensing models for open access contents. Its release caused a massive reaction from the scientific community and numerous organizations in the form of an open letter called Coalition Letter on STM Model Licenses, which so far gathered 83 organizations, including SciELO. The signatories understand that already established Creative Commons licenses cover a wide spectrum of possibilities, and that open access dispense new licenses. Read More →

Productivism, research and scholarly communication: the thin line between poison and medicine

With the word, Teresa Cristina Rego: “It is an pressing requirement that new ways of encouraging, evaluating and socializing academic output are created. This is the great challenge facing us”. “Our government and its representatives, who work in bodies linked to the evaluation and promotion of research, should also be aware of the gravity of the situation in which we find ourselves. And this must be done before it is too late”. In an essay which concentrates upon the thorny questions surrounding productivism, the researcher opens a series of three interviews which focus on a discussion of the challenges facing Brazilian science published in volume 40 of the journal Educação e Pesquisa (Education and Research). Read More →

Profile of researchers that integrate the core of world science publishing

A limited number of researchers all over the world can keep a continuous and uninterrupted flow of publications over time. This ability is shared by only 1% of researchers, who form the core of most productive and cited scientists. The inability to maintain this flow is translated into less scientific impact. Read More →

Ethical publishing – should plagiarized pieces be retracted ? – well, perhaps not all

An article that contains sections of texts copied from other sources (plagiarism) does not necessarily make its research bad or invalid. Even though this is a warning of unethical behavior, this does not always merit the rejection or retraction of the article concerned. This is the opinion published recently in an article in Nature. Read More →

Ethical Publishing – the time line of a case of plagiarism

The most advanced research, which is published in elite journals such as Nature, is not beyond plagiarism or serious misconduct. In a recent case in stem cell research at Weseda University in Japan, the university ordered a review of the 280 theses produced at the RIKEN Institute since its founding in 2007. Read More →