Category: Analysis

Data papers… and FAIR [Originally published in the Road to FAIR blog in June/2022]

Photograph of a laptop, a notebook and a sheet of paper with images of graphics on a gray table.

In a scientific ecosystem increasingly oriented towards the perspective of Open Science, data papers are a new species of scholarly publication, especially in the social sciences and humanities (SSH). Read More →

Scholarly publishing and electric cars: A comment on “The big idea: should we get rid of the scientific paper?”

The big idea: should we get rid of the academic paper?, published in the Guardian, argues that because scholarly publishing is an old practice and because it’s flawed, it should be replaced by something more “modern”. Glenn Hampson, Executive Director of the Science Communication Institute (SCI) and Program Director of the Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) comments on the article. Read More →

A comment on “The big idea: should we get rid of the scientific paper?”

In The big idea: should we get rid of the scientific paper?, published in The Guardian, Stuart Ritchie argues for a radical action: scientists should abandon the current format of the scientific paper, which is static and not interactive. Adeilton Brandão, Editor in Chief of Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz and researcher at Fiocruz, comments on the article. Read More →

Society has a strong demand for open access science

Analysis of more than 1.6 million comments left on downloads by the US National Academies shows that half are for academic use and the other half reveal adults across the country who seek highest quality information to improve the way they work, satisfy their curiosity, and learn. Knowing the importance of such information, policymakers should be encouraged to protect it. Read More →

Measuring and comparing Brazilian and Latin-American universities in terms of academic and industry related knowledge production

The use of the multidimensional academic ranking U-Multirank to compare academic and industry-related knowledge production of Brazilian Universities with other Latin American countries, shows that, while Brazil leads in number of academic publications, Chile is ahead in both citation numbers and patents awarded, with Brazil lagging behind in these Indicators’ world averages. Read More →

How altmetrics are used to evaluate scientific output in Latin America

Altmetrics are a group of alternative metrics that capture mentions made to scientific papers on social networks, news sites and blogs; policies and patents; Wikipedia, and other sources to assess the impact of publications on the social web. A study using journals and articles from the SciELO network in Latin America was carried out to qualify the web presence of Latin American research results and explore the potential of altmetrics. Read More →

How the rhetoric of excellence influences research evaluation

Lineart Flat e-learning website hero image vector illustration. Online education knowledge concept. Laptop, profile of school studding graduation certificate, first place medal on screen.

Academic institutions advertise their teaching and research programs associated with prominent positions in university rankings, or names that are synonymous with success, prestige, and reputation. This post reviews an article that shows how the “rhetoric of excellence” is used in the academic world and favors the lack of reproducibility, fraud and the ineffective distribution of research grants and proposes strategies to overcome it. Read More →

OJS Community Priorities Survey Report [Originally published in the PKP site]

The PKP Technical Committee completed its first community survey, with a focus on trying to better understand what specific features journal managers and editors of OJS would find most useful for their work. We distributed this survey broadly, and were delighted by the enthusiastic response, resulting in more than 524 completed surveys. Read More →

The latest blows from predatory (or pirate) journals

Albertus Seba, Locupletissimi rerum naturalium via the Wellcome Collection

Piracy and, specifically, scams by predatory publishers are growing around the world, becoming a growing concern in academic publishing, drawing the attention of the most serious publishers. This problem is not so serious in Latin American scientific publications. Post available only in Spanish. Read More →

The Impossibility of Open Science without Otherness and Epistemic Plurality [Originally published as the editorial in Revista de Administração Contemporânea vol. 26 no. 2]

[The] objective in this text is to present a counterpoint to the positivist bias that has dominated the debate on open science and eventually highlight some problems and provide a more plural and inclusive perspective on the subject. Read More →

Guest Post — Building an Easier Path Toward Open Access Book Publishing: Support for Authors [Originally published in the Scholarly Kitchen in March/2021]

Christina Emery presents an updated overview of the open access books landscape and examines the challenges of open access book publishing according to feedback from authors and researchers, plus what support is available to them. Read More →

How much does it cost to publish an article? Academic publishing services and their market values

How much does it cost to publish an open access article? This post reports a study published in F1000Research, in which the authors collected detailed data on each stage of scientific publishing, from acquisition, preparation, up to dissemination of content, considering six scenarios with different editorial service providers. The average cost varies between US$460 and US$520, depending on the number of articles published per year. Read More →

Study on the use of continuous publication in SciELO Brazil collection

The study carried out by researchers from the Universidade Federal University do Rio Grande do Sul points out that there is a tendency, in recent years, for journals to move away from the publication model based on volume and numbers, with a significant increase in adherence to continuous publication. The publication mode gained importance in Brazil after being included in the SciELO Brazil publishing criteria. Read More →

How will the Rights Retention Strategy affect scholarly publishing? [Originally published in the LSE Impact blog in September/2021]

The extent that authors retain control over their published research is dependent on what rights they sign over to their publisher prior to publication. As part of efforts to promote the immediate open publication of research a number of research funders have endorsed the Rights Retention Strategy (RRS), by which authors can declare their author-accepted manuscript to be open access. In this post Stephen Eglen, explores the rights retention strategy and discusses the potential impact it might have on scholarly communication more broadly. Read More →

Comments on convenience authorship [Originally published as the editorial in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências vol. 93 no. 3]

One of the consequences of this pandemic is the increase of submission of scientific articles that has raised concerns about their quality. Along with this come authorship issues, such as convenience authorship, which should also appear on the editors’ radar because of the potential deleterious consequences that could affect the new generation of scientists. Read More →