Tag: Open Access

Notice to mariners – times have changed

Open access… and everything. Finally, what happened 20 years ago and felt like a utopia of copyright pirates is becoming irreversible, like a tsunami. Publishers and scientific information cannot ignore the theme of open access, so that they can compete and don’t stay out of this market. Things are changing and there’s no going back. Read More →

SciELO updates the indexing criteria. New version takes effect from May 2020

The new criteria for indexing journals in the SciELO Brazil Collection are centered on best editorial practices and are effective as of May 2020. The criteria reflect the objectives, principles and functions of the SciELO Program and implement the priority lines of action of professionalization, internationalization and sustainability aligned with the open science modus operandi. Adjustment of editorial policy and management is the main action that journals must take to comply with the new criteria. Read More →

SciELO Books and open access in epidemic times: More important than ever

The COVID-19 pandemic has spelled out the decisive role of open access (OA) to knowledge and scientific evidence. Globally, there is a temporary opening of collections of paid-for books and subscription journals to support overcoming the pandemic. SciELO Books permanently indexes, publishes and disseminates a collection of more than 700 books in OA, contributing to support public and professional policies, the expansion of the university, valuing the academic book, and the disciplines that make intensive use of the book. Read More →

Why does reform of scientific communication seem so difficult and slow?

The world faces global problems for which science is needed as part of the solution. Yet the scientific communication system is not nearly as quick and open as necessary for efficient worldwide collaboration. The powers that are in a position to reform the system are too timid. Will crises like COVID-19 shake them awake? Read More →

The SciELO publication model as an open access public policy

This post shares the brief description of the SciELO open access publication model presented by Abel L Packer, Director of SciELO, at the 14th Berlin Debate on Science and Science Policy which was themed “Who Owns Science? Reshaping the Scientific Value Chain in the 21st Century”. The description highlights the SciELO Program as a framework for the development and implementation of national policies to support quality journals and as an international cooperation program. The debate was held in the context of the Falling Walls Conference commemorating the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Read More →

Transparency: What Can One Learn from a Trove of Invoices? [Originally published in the Scholarly Kitchen blog in November/2019]

A new dataset from the Gates Foundation offers insights into author choices and APC pricing. Read More →

Tropical Medicine/Infectious and Parasitic Diseases journals align with open science editorial practices

Three of the most important journals in the areas of Tropical Medicine/Infectious and Parasitic Diseases of the SciELO Brazil Collection decided to adopt open science practices to provide more transparency, increase sharing and open access to the research results they report. This is the first of a series of novel pilot projects promoted by SciELO to inform editorial policies as well as to enable the management and operation of journals in the appropriation of and interoperability with preprints, research data and other content underlying the article texts for subsequent progressive opening of the peer review process. Read More →

Journal Indexing: Core standards and why they matter [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in August/2019]

The ways in which journals are indexed online is essential to how they can be searched for and found. Inclusion in certain indexes is also closely linked to quality assessment, with research funders often requiring their grantees to publish in outlets listed in certain indexes. In this post Danielle Padula explains the importance of good journal indexing and how journals that apply key standards can increase the reach and impact of their publications. Read More →

Open Science and the new research communication modus operandi – Part II

The adopting process of open science modus operandi involves all phases, actors, and political and institutional research instances. In research projects, openness is organized and pervasive throughout the entire research cycle. This post provides an overview of the openness process, content, and research outcomes in light of the SciELO Program’s priority lines of action. It is divided into two parts. See Part I here. Read More →

Open Science and the new research communication modus operandi – Part I

The adopting process of open science modus operandi involves all phases, actors, and political and institutional research instances. In research projects, openness is organized and pervasive throughout the entire research cycle. This post provides an overview of the openness process, content, and research outcomes in light of the SciELO Program’s priority lines of action. It is divided into two parts. See Part II here. Read More →

Open Access Plans — S, T, U, so far

Things do seem to be moving in Open Access (OA). First there was Plan S, proposed by science funders in the European Union, then a proposal to fund OA from submission fees rather than article processing charges, (perhaps flippantly) called Plan T, and now, in alphabetical sequence, Plan U. All three have strong merits, but Plan U has the best chance of succeeding and offers the most to the scientific community. Read More →

The gold rush: Why open access will boost publisher profits [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in June/2019]

An important justification for transitioning from a subscription based journal publishing system to an open access journal publishing system, has been that whereas printing and distributing physical copies of journals is an expensive process, the cost of digital publication and dissemination are marginal. In this post Shaun Khoo argues that whilst a shift to gold (pay to publish) open access would deliver wider access to research, the lack of price sensitivity amongst academics presents a risk that they will be locked into a new escalating pay to publish system that could potentially be more costly to researchers than the previous subscription model. Read More →

Journals that increased their APC value received more submissions

One of the expected contributions of Open Access (OA) was to resolve the disproportionate increase of scholarly journals’ subscriptions. Nevertheless, one of the major business models for commercial journal publishing is to charge authors a publication fee known as Article Processing Charge (APC). This rate, in the last five years, has risen more than inflation. However, counterintuitively, it seems that the authors are far from reducing their submissions due to increase of APC values, rather, submissions are increasing, and the more expensive the APC, the more articles the journals have been receiving. Read More →

Perspectives on the open access discovery landscape [Originally published in the Jisc Scholarly Communications blog in April/2019]

Open access discovery tools enable users to find scholarly articles that are available in open form, whether on a publisher’s website or elsewhere. This is a technically-challenging endeavour and also requires a deep understanding of the scholarly communications landscape, the underpinning infrastructure and the needs of widely different stakeholder groups such as researchers, publishers, service providers and the general public. Read More →

Launch of the Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication Platforms to democratize knowledge [Originally published in UNESCO’s website in April/2019]

Open access to scientific knowledge gained significant momentum with the alliance of 6 web-based journal publishing platforms from four continents – AJOL from Africa, AmeliCA from Latin America and Global South, Érudit from Canada, J-STAGE from Japan, OpenEdition from France and the SciELO Network that operates in Latin America, South Africa, Spain and Portugal. The Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication (GLOALL) was conceived during the SciELO 20 Years Week and formally launched on April 8 in the session dedicated to the dissemination of scientific information of the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS). The session and the launching of the GLOALL were promoted by UNESCO. The alliance defends geographic, thematic and cultural bibliodiversity in the development of the global flow of scientific information. Read More →