Author: Scielo

Coronavirus: anti-denial lessons and the future of the planet

Based on an interdisciplinary approach, the article makes a social historical reading of the epidemics in the world and their impacts on human life, punctuating the differences with the so-called Covid-19. The proliferation of the virus has forced a radical change in the daily lives of populations on a global level, suggesting that it is possible to act collectively to create future worlds. The radical action of isolation against the virus has demonstrated relevant impacts with respect to the climate emergency, at a time when it reveals the impacts of denialism, the interests and limits of capitalism and the financial market in the epidemic crisis. Read More →

RAP | Call for short papers I: Governmental responses to COVID-19 pandemic

December 12th 2019 marked the appearance of a new coronavirus (COVID-19). Declared a pandemic by the WHO, COVID-19 has been exposing the weaknesses of health systems and challenging governments globally. Revista de Administração Pública drew up a series of actions to join in on the efforts of public, private, and non-profit actors mobilized in facing the pandemic. Read More →

COVID-19 pneumonia: what is the role of imaging in diagnosis? [Originally published in J. bras. pneumol., vol. 46 no. 2]

The current global COVID-19 pandemic is related to an acute respiratory disease caused by a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which is highly contagious and whose evolution is still little known. Considering the current case definition, based on the diagnosis of pneumonia, more than 100,000 cases of COVID-19 infection have been confirmed worldwide, and the associated mortality rate has fluctuated around 2%1. However, recent changes in the diagnostic criteria of the disease have led to an increase in the rate of new cases and, on a daily basis, increasing numbers and challenges have been the subject of intense debate on the topic by the scientific community. Read More →

Coronavirus 2020 [Originally published as an editorial in Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem vol. 73 no. 2]

Emerging and reemerging infectious diseases are constant challenges for public health worldwide. Recent cases of pneumonia of unknown cause in Wuhan, China, have led to the discovery of a new type of Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), which are enveloped RNA viruses, commonly found in humans, other mammals and birds, capable of causing respiratory, enteric, hepatic, and neurological disease. Read More →

Immediate Health Surveillance Response to COVID-19 Epidemic [Originally published as an editorial in Epidemiologia e Serviços de Saúde vol. 29 no. 1]

On December 31st 2019 the World Health Organization (WHO) was notified of the occurrence of a pneumonia outbreak in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China. The etiological agent was rapidly identified as a novel coronavirus: SARS-COV-2. The outbreak began in a seafood and live animals market and, as at the date of this publication, the animal reservoir is unknown. Read More →

The value of mitigating epidemic peaks of COVID-19 for more effective public health responses [Originally published as an editorial in Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical vol. 53]

The emergence of SARS-Cov-2 virus in Wuhan, China, in December of 2019 led to a local epidemic that rapidly spread to multiple countries in the world, placing remarkable challenges in surveillance and control. In March 16th, 2020, WHO declared that the infection associated with SARS-Cov-2, named COVID-19, had spread to more than 100 countries, with more than 160,000 confirmed cases and more than 6,000 deaths globally. Read More →

Unlock ways to share peer review data

Peer review is the intrinsic process of scientific research. However, there are few systematic studies on this procedure, and it is not easy to gain access to management information administered by publishers. The PEERE project, funded by the European Community, would make this data available as a public good. Read More →

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak highlights serious deficiencies in scholarly communication [Originally published in the LSE Impact blog in March/2020]

As research and government responses to the COVID-19 outbreak escalate in the face of a global public health crisis, Vincent Larivière, Fei Shu and Cassidy R. Sugimoto reflect on efforts to make research on this subject more widely available. Arguing that a narrow focus on research published in high ranking journals predominantly in English has impeded research efforts, they suggest that the renewed emphasis on carrying out open research on the virus presents an opportunity to reassess how research and scholarly communication systems serve the public good. Read More →

The Road to Preprints (Part 2): SciELO’s Preprint Server [Originally published in the PKP website in March/2020]

Our preprints story continues with a guest post by SciELO. In addition to seed funding to make Open Preprint Systems (OPS) possible, SciELO is working closely with the PKP team to make sure that the software is developed and maintained following state-of-the-art best practices and that its features satisfy the needs of a diverse community. Read More →

The Road to Preprints (Part 1): Introducing Open Preprint Systems [Originally published in the PKP website in February/2020]

Our story begins in February 2017 when SciELO first announced their quest for a preprint server. Like many circa 2016, SciELO was coming around to the idea that preprints could and would serve an important part in their strategy for open science. But despite a clear vision and path to get there, SciELO was missing an important piece: infrastructure. Read More →

Brazilian Journal of Nephrology: trajectory and internationalization

With 40 years of uninterrupted publication, Brazilian Journal of Nephrology traces the path towards its internationalization, based on professionalization and without constant improvement of its editorial processes and scientific quality. It is now in a new phase, where reaching its greatest indexing potential and strengthening its presence in Latin America represent its main challenges. Read More →

Sorbonne declaration on research data rights [Originally published in the LERU website in January/2020]

The opening of research data is one of the practices of open science that is progressively being globalized. In November 2019, the Network of Scientific Data Repositories of the State of São Paulo, formed by eight universities and research institutions, was launched. In January 2020, leaders of eight university networks gathered at the International Research Data Rights Summit at Sorbonne Université signed the Sorbonne Declaration on Research Data Rights, which is reproduced in this post in the original English version. Read More →

CRediT Check – Should we welcome tools to differentiate the contributions made to academic papers? [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in January/2020]

Elsevier is the latest in a lengthening list of publishers to announce their adoption for 1,200 journals of the CASRAI Contributor Role Taxonomy (CRediT). Authors of papers in these journals will be required to define their contributions in relation to a predefined taxonomy of 14 roles. In this post, Elizabeth Gadd weighs the pros and cons of defining contributorship in a more prescriptive fashion and asks whether there is a risk of incentivising new kinds of competitive behaviour and forms of evaluation that doesn’t benefit researchers. Read More →

Peer review is not just quality control, it is part of the social infrastructure of research [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in June/2019]

The purpose of peer review is often portrayed as being a simple ‘objective’ test of the soundness or quality of a research paper. However, it also performs other functions primarily through linking and developing relationships between networks of researchers. In this post, Flaminio Squazzoni explores these interconnections and argues that to understand peer review as simply an exercise in quality control is to be blind to the historical, political and social dimensions of peer review. Read More →

The SciELO publication model as an open access public policy

This post shares the brief description of the SciELO open access publication model presented by Abel L Packer, Director of SciELO, at the 14th Berlin Debate on Science and Science Policy which was themed “Who Owns Science? Reshaping the Scientific Value Chain in the 21st Century”. The description highlights the SciELO Program as a framework for the development and implementation of national policies to support quality journals and as an international cooperation program. The debate was held in the context of the Falling Walls Conference commemorating the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Read More →