Author: Scielo

How to write an academic review? [Originally published in DADOS’ blog in July/2019]

The purpose of this post is to outline what a reviewer should consider before writing an assessment. In it, we discuss issues such as the importance of writing reviews, the types of possible reviews, what to do when detecting a conflict of interest, etc. Read More →

Journal Indexing: Core standards and why they matter [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in August/2019]

The ways in which journals are indexed online is essential to how they can be searched for and found. Inclusion in certain indexes is also closely linked to quality assessment, with research funders often requiring their grantees to publish in outlets listed in certain indexes. In this post Danielle Padula explains the importance of good journal indexing and how journals that apply key standards can increase the reach and impact of their publications. Read More →

The 2019 Workshop on Open Scientometric Data Infrastructures at Leiden University [Originally published in the CWTS blog in August/2019]

The Open Scientometric Data Infrastructures Workshop took place at CWTS on 28 February and 1 March 2019. Over the course of two days, 14 researchers from CWTS and other research institutes and universities came together to discuss current projects and initiatives regarding open scientometric data infrastructures. This blog post provides a summary on the presentations and discussions held at the event. Read More →

Open Science and the new research communication modus operandi – Part II

The adopting process of open science modus operandi involves all phases, actors, and political and institutional research instances. In research projects, openness is organized and pervasive throughout the entire research cycle. This post provides an overview of the openness process, content, and research outcomes in light of the SciELO Program’s priority lines of action. It is divided into two parts. See Part I here. Read More →

Open Science and the new research communication modus operandi – Part I

The adopting process of open science modus operandi involves all phases, actors, and political and institutional research instances. In research projects, openness is organized and pervasive throughout the entire research cycle. This post provides an overview of the openness process, content, and research outcomes in light of the SciELO Program’s priority lines of action. It is divided into two parts. See Part II here. Read More →

Registry of [Open] Scientometric Data Sources – a collaborative directory of scientometric data sources [Originally published in the TIB Blog in May/2019]

This post introduces the development of an open accessible registry of data sources for scientometric information envisaging to get feedback and collaboration of the information science communities towards a global coverage. Read More →

Web presence and social media metrics from articles shared on Twitter – Interview with Stefanie Haustein

Knowing how and by whom articles are shared on social media can help the challenging task of qualifying alternative metrics indicators. In this interview, Stefanie Haustein, assistant professor at the University of Ottawa’s School of Information Studies in Canada and co-director of the ScholCommLab, addresses the role of social networks such as Twitter as a data source for altmetrics. She also looks at the role journals play in the dissemination of their articles on Twitter and investigates how scholarly articles from Brazil and Brazilian Twitter users tweet about scholarly outputs. Read More →

The gold rush: Why open access will boost publisher profits [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in June/2019]

An important justification for transitioning from a subscription based journal publishing system to an open access journal publishing system, has been that whereas printing and distributing physical copies of journals is an expensive process, the cost of digital publication and dissemination are marginal. In this post Shaun Khoo argues that whilst a shift to gold (pay to publish) open access would deliver wider access to research, the lack of price sensitivity amongst academics presents a risk that they will be locked into a new escalating pay to publish system that could potentially be more costly to researchers than the previous subscription model. Read More →

Perspectives on the open access discovery landscape [Originally published in the Jisc Scholarly Communications blog in April/2019]

Open access discovery tools enable users to find scholarly articles that are available in open form, whether on a publisher’s website or elsewhere. This is a technically-challenging endeavour and also requires a deep understanding of the scholarly communications landscape, the underpinning infrastructure and the needs of widely different stakeholder groups such as researchers, publishers, service providers and the general public. Read More →

Mapping the impact of UN Sustainable Development Goals on global research [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in May/2019]

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent one of the largest and most sustained influences on global research to date. However, charting the effect of these 17 goals on the global research community is a complex task. In this post, Martin Szomszor draws on the findings of a recent bibliometric study to produce a ‘citation map’ of sustainability research, which highlights how the UN SDGs have enabled the development of new areas of transdisciplinary and international collaboration in research. Read More →

Launch of the Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication Platforms to democratize knowledge [Originally published in UNESCO’s website in April/2019]

Open access to scientific knowledge gained significant momentum with the alliance of 6 web-based journal publishing platforms from four continents – AJOL from Africa, AmeliCA from Latin America and Global South, Érudit from Canada, J-STAGE from Japan, OpenEdition from France and the SciELO Network that operates in Latin America, South Africa, Spain and Portugal. The Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication (GLOALL) was conceived during the SciELO 20 Years Week and formally launched on April 8 in the session dedicated to the dissemination of scientific information of the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS). The session and the launching of the GLOALL were promoted by UNESCO. The alliance defends geographic, thematic and cultural bibliodiversity in the development of the global flow of scientific information. Read More →

Wellcome Open Research, the future of scholarly communication? [Originally published in LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog in February/2019]

In this blog, Robert Kiley and Michael Markie, discuss the ambition behind creating Wellcome Open Research, an innovative funder led publishing platform, and assess the success of the platform over its first two years. Going on to imagine a future, in which all research is published using the principles behind Wellcome Open Research, they suggest the potential benefits such a publishing system would have for research and research assessment. Read More →

SciELO after 20 Years: the future remains open

The present and future of the SciELO Program, of the 15 collections of the SciELO Network and, particularly, of the over 1,000 SciELO journals, was widely analyzed and debated at the SciELO 20 Years Week in the context of a globalized and inclusive scholarly communication. The alignment with open science becomes the driving force behind the operation and improvement of quality journals focused on professionalization, internationalization, and operational and financial sustainability. The expectation is that within the next three years most journals and the research they publish will be operating according to the best practices of open science. Read More →

The role of non-Brazilian contribution in the publishing performance of psychology journals in Brazil

An examination of publishing performance among psychology journals in Brazil finds higher publishing performance associated with non-Brazilian contribution, in terms of: authors and editorial board members from English-speaking countries; as well as collaboration with authors from English-speaking countries. Implications are discussed for editors and publishers, as well as arbiters of public policy. Read More →

The absurdity of the same requirement for law that the rest of the scientific publications

Bibliometric indexes (e.g., WoS/Scopus), normally used for hard sciences and even social sciences, should not be used as a parameter for law research in the same way, as it does not respond to the same extent to measure quality or productivity of research in this field. Text available only in Spanish. Read More →