Meeting considers how open access could address inequalities – Originally published in Research Information on October 19, 2014

oaspa_thumb

Mark Patterson reports back from the COASP meeting that was held in Paris in September. The meeting presented a broad range of initiatives covering diverse geographical regions, subject areas and content types. The overarching sense was one of progress on a number of fronts, and the prospects for much greater change in the sphere of scholarly communication. Read More →

Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals – Originally published on Google Scholar Blog on October 8, 2014

google_metrics_thumb

The world of scholarly communication has changed quite a bit over the last decade. This post from Google Scholar team explore the impact of these changes – looking at how scholarship and citation patterns have changed as publications and archives moved online and comprehensive relevance-ranked search became available to everyone. Read More →

The challenges of retraction: cleaning up the literature might be difficult

retraction_thumb

There is consensus that misconduct in academic publications should be remedied as soon as possible. However, there are a number of implications – ethical, moral, legal and those related to the reputation of the journals and researchers in the retraction process – that turn the process into a complex one which can often become unworkable. Read More →

The annual meeting of SciELO signals a new phase in the Program

reuniao_scielo_thumb

Beginning in 2015, SciELO Brazil will operate under new indexing criteria based on complying with a list of requirements and indicators related to the adoption of the lines of action of professionalization, internationalization and financial sustainability promoted by the SciELO Program. These lines of action aim to contribute to the improvement of the performance of the SciELO journals. The leadership of the editors-in-chief is vital to the adoption of these lines of action. The annual meeting of SciELO Brazil will take place in December with a focus on discussions of the evolution of the performance of the journals, and adopting new indexing criteria. Read More →

Publish or perish? The rise of the fractional author… – Originally published on the Elsevier newsletter “Research Trends Issue 38″

publish

Andrew Plume and Daphne van Weijen investigate how the pressure researchers feel to publish their work has affected co-authorship patterns over the past 10 years. Are researchers publishing more unique articles or co-authoring more articles? Read More →

Retraction of scientific works and pseudoscience

retracted_thumb

Is the growing number of scientific retractions necessarily due to the fruits of pseudoscience? Productive reflection on the subject leads us to the need to recognize the current demands of the scientific system for researchers, conflicts of interests at stake and that science is produced by fallible human beings with their own moral values ​​. Globalization, while supporting misconduct, strengthens social control. Increased retraction of papers is a necessary response of the social control to what some authors refer to as “pseudoscience”. Read More →

Latin-American repositories have little visibility in Google Scholar

Google_Scholar_logo_thumb

A recent study concerning the visibility of Latin American scholarly output in open access repositories reveals their poor indexing in Google and Google Scholar. The technical reasons for these problems, which affect the visibility of Latin-American research which, for the most part, is not indexed in either in WoS or Scopus, are explained in this post. Read More →

Editorial ethics – good and bad scientific practices

mad_scientist_thumb

III BRISPE: Brazilian Meeting on Research Integrity, Science and Publication Ethics, sponsored by FAPESP, was the third event held in Brazil with the objective to promote institutional policies and practices of ethical research integrity and responsible conduct. With the presence of several prestigious guests from developed countries, the education strategies to new scientists were analyzed as well as how to reduce bad practices such falsification of data, plagiarism, conflict of interests, manipulation of results, etc. Read More →

Social networks and scientific journalism: a challenge to editors

benchimol_thumb

In an interview to the Blog SciELO in Perspective, Jaime L. Benchimol discusses the use of social networks and scientific journalism as a challenge to publishers. He shares his experience and presents the history and challenges of História, Ciências, Saúde – Manguinhos, pointing out: “You have to equip yourself properly and, as important as gaining the support of funding agencies, is to convince the leaders of universities and institutions that scientific journals are indispensable and are costly and complex and cannot be made by improvisations and voluntarism of some selfless”. Read More →

SciELO participates in the Global coalition supporting Creative Commons licenses to access journal articles

editorial_thumb

The STM International Association launched a series of new licensing models for open access contents. Its release caused a massive reaction from the scientific community and numerous organizations in the form of an open letter called Coalition Letter on STM Model Licenses, which so far gathered 83 organizations, including SciELO. The signatories understand that already established Creative Commons licenses cover a wide spectrum of possibilities, and that open access dispense new licenses. Read More →