France prepares bill to regulate open access

France is preparing a bill to regulate open access to scientific research results financed with public funds. The text of the law, however, does not agree with what the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) believes it benefits the scientific community, the French and the world society. The project is available for public consultation and any Internet user can suggest changes that will impact on the way research is conveyed digitally. Your feedback is very important, vote you too. Read More →

The publishing proposal of the Open Library of Humanities [Originally published in The Impact Factor Blog]

The Open Library of Humanities ( is no longer a project. On September 28th, 2015 the mega-journal for humanities and the social sciences came into existence, and at the same time a new funding model. Read More →

Project Making Data Count encourages sharing of research data

Sharing of research data (open data) is increasing in all areas related to scientific research, and it involves authors, journals, publishers, funding agencies, the productive sector and society. In order to encourage authors to provide and reuse datasets, it is paramount to find ways to measure their impact. The initiative ‘Making Data Count’ is efficiently doing this, find out how. Read More →

The BMJ requires data sharing to publish clinical trials

Increased publication of clinical trial outcomes has been promoted by regional and global initiatives in order to increase transparency, reproducibility and reliability of the assays. The BMJ follows this movement, becoming the first journal to require availability of individual patient data, anonymously and upon request, as a prerequisite for publication. Read More →

The favourable perception of open access increases among researchers


A research conducted by the Nature Publishing Group indicates that the perception of open access (OA) publishing is rapidly changing among researchers. In 2014, 40% of authors who have not published in OA journals declared themselves concerned about the quality of publications, a percentage which fell to 27% in 2015. The NPG supports OA publications and recognizes its importance, publishing 56% of the articles in this format. Read More →

What is holding back the transition to open access if it does not cost more?


Transition to Article Processing Charge supported open access from a closed access subscription system is far from straightforward, even if the cost of such an open access system is the same, or even less. There are glimmers of hope, though, in an approach that may help to overcome the hurdles, by taking a large-scale, even nationwide, approach as opposed to the usual one where each individual institution has to weigh up the costs and benefits. Read More →

SciELO’s Contribution to the Globalization of Science [Originally published in Digital Science’s “Perspectives” blog]


SciELO was created in Brazil about two decades ago when international indexes limited their coverage to the so called main stream journals ignoring an universe of journals edited by regional publishers mainly from developing and non-English speaking countries. Aiming to increase the quality and visibility of world-class research communicated by these nationally edited peer reviewed journals, SciELO quickly emerged as an indexing and publishing model adopted by a network of 15 countries that covers over one thousand journals, more than 500 thousand articles that serve a daily average of more than 1 million downloads. SciELO contributes to the globalization of science and to the cultural enrichment of the international flow of scientific information. This post by the directors of SciELO was originally published on Digital Science’s blog, “Perspectives”. Read More →

Rebuttal to the blog post “Is SciELO a Publication Favela?” authored by Jeffrey Beall


Editors of scientific journals sign note of rejection to Mr. Jeffrey Beall’s attempt of freely depreciate the successful image of SciELO. Read the note here Read More →

Open Access in Latin America: a paragon for the rest of the world [Originally published in the SPARC blog]


Manifesto signed by scholars and representatives of pro-open access associations, published on the website of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition – SPARC, repudiates the ideas advocated by Jeffrey Beall disqualifying SciELO (and Redalyc) in favor of control over journals by large commercial publishers. The manifesto states that open access is exemplary in Latin America. Read More →

The advanced management of manuscript evaluations was the focus of the first ScholarOne refresher course at SciELO


The idea for the refresher course SciELO-ScholarOne, held August 7 in the auditorium of FAPES in São Paulo, came from the need to further improve the level of professionalization of the editorial teams of the SciELO journals that use ScholarOne. The course was attended by close to 180 participants, representing 77 journals from different areas of knowledge. Read More →