Tag: Dissemination Of Information

Pirates of the medical literature – a worldwide bibliometric study

A large volume of medical literature is being illegally downloaded in almost every country in the world. There is a significant relationship between the scientific output of these countries and the density of illegal downloads, especially in middle-income countries. This unequal pattern of legal access to medical literature requires the attention of both the publishing industry and policy makers. Read More →

Find out everything about the WG Institutional journal portals and the transition to Open Science that took place in the SciELO Network Meeting [Originally published in Periódicos de Minas’ blog in October/2018]

The SciELO Network Meeting took place on September 2018, in celebration of SciELO’s 20 years. At the occasion, eight working groups met to discuss topics related to scientific journals. Working Group 7 discussed Institutional Journal Portals and the transition to Open Science. Check out how went the WG experience. Read More →

Implications of SciELO in the history of science coverage in LA&C

Historical data on the presence of America/Latin America in bibliographic sources were used as references to review the implications of SciELO in the recent coverage of scientific journals in the region. Three scenarios were mentioned. Expansion of modern science (journals and catalog of the Royal Society, XVII-XIX centuries); hegemony of the Anglo-Saxon citation indexes (20th century); diversification of coverage and type of indexes (21st century). Through the citation geography visible in SciELO, signs of changes can be seen in the specialization of regional journals as cited sources; we believe that this trend will continue in journals covering regional issues. Text available only in Spanish. Read More →

How journals can make the most of Crossref membership

Welcome to the Crossref/SciELO blog series on DOIs and the metadata associated with these persistent identifiers. In the previous posts Chrissie Cormack Wood, Head of Communications introduced you to Crossref, I talked about the critical role of the DOI, Isaac Farley, Crossref Support Manager, wrote about the difference between preprints and ahead of print, and Rachael Lammey, Head of Community Outreach discussed the options for DOI acquisition. This blog completes this series, and provides information on how journals can extend their use of Crossref DOIs to additional services. Read More →

Open Access and open science: a historic opportunity

The open access movement in Latin America has a historic opportunity to connect with other practices, tools and experiences of open science – open data, open parts evaluation, open laboratory notebooks, open software and free hardware – and invite other actors to participate and share their contributions to science. Read More →

Series of interviews with the President and ex-presidents of the ABEC: Interview with Lewis Joel Greene

The Associação Brasileira de Editores Científicos (ABEC) and SciELO have key roles in promoting policies aimed at the advancement of Brazilian science regarding production, dissemination and internationalization, as well as always bringing to discussion topics such as ethics and best practices, aiming to foster the entire Brazilian publishing ecosystem, i.e., from the researcher/author through service providers, until its publication. This interview, with Lewis Joel Greene, who served as president of ABEC from 1996 to 1999 is the second in the series of interviews with the President and ex-presidents of the ABEC.
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The basics of sponsorship at Crossref

There are many journals that want to register content and benefit from the services provided by Crossref, but may not be able to do so alone. These organizations use sponsors. Sponsors are organizations who publish on behalf of groups of smaller organizations. Nearly 650 of the 800 Brazil members of Crossref are represented by such a sponsor. Read More →

The basics of content types: Preprints, Crossmark, translations, and more

What’s the difference between preprints and ahead of print? When should you use each; and, what are the DOI requirements? This article answers those questions and provides a basic overview of how to connect the metadata records of related content types, like translations. Read More →

Do the article and scientific journals have a future?

How to think the future of scholarly communication, aiming at its broadest circulation, use, citation, and impact? It is proposed to preferentially focus on meeting the needs of the “Great Dialogue” in knowledge production and less on the financing and survival strategies of canonical forms of scholarly communication before the disruptive effects of open access. Read More →

Books’ relevance in scholarly communication – The case of SciELO Books

Manuscripts were the first repositories of scholarly communication. Over the centuries and new technologies, science has been communicated by books, by personal correspondence between researchers, journals and paper books, until we came to electronic technologies and the Internet. Throughout the 20th century, journals became predominant as a means of communicating research results, with rapid adaptation to the features offered by technological changes. At the SciELO Network Meeting of the SciELO 20 Years Week, a working group will analyze and discuss the relevance of books in scholarly communication, focusing on the progress of academic publishers and, more specifically, the SciELO Books Program. Read More →

The critical role of the DOI

Find out why URL links to research articles are fragile, and how DOIs are essential in building stable, persistent links between research objects. This is achieved through the metadata that members deposit with Crossref, as part of their obligations. Learn how we can all contribute to creating a global, robust research record. Read More →

Journals’ presence and impact on the social web: Towards the social media impact factor

The routine practice of evaluating the journal Impact Factor to determine where to submit a manuscript has been reconsidered to the detriment of the social impact of the journal in the relationship that the journal establishes with the scientific community and the public. Social media metrics act in this direction by measuring the journal social media impact factor which may assist in managing the journals’ web presence in the profiles kept on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook. Read More →

Scientific-public interface in times of correction of scientific literature: Contemporary ethical issues

The process of correcting scientific literature becomes increasingly accelerated and reflects, among several factors, a greater scrutiny by scientific publishers. Unlike what happened about two decades ago, when retracting an article was rare, today it has been integrated into the editorial culture. In this context, the way in which this correction process is articulated with the news flow about science deserves attention. In the science-public interface, retractions broaden the spaces to strengthen public understanding about science and its mechanisms of self-regulation. How to extend this space is one of the ethical discussions of our time. Read More →

Why Crossref exists and persists

In today’s world, an author’s work needs a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for it to become discoverable, citable, and linkable. This unique alphanumeric string identifies the content of a research work, and remains associated with it irrespective of changes to its web location. Discover the origins of the DOI, how Crossref was founded, and why they continue to exist and persist. Read More →

How long does it take to do science? The emergence of time in scholarly communication

Scholarly communication has undergone great transformations in the last two decades, mainly due to the popularization of new information technologies, which imposes a new regime of time and speed in scientific publishing. However, these changes are not just responses to technological advances. These are more complex issues related to the reconfiguration of academic work and changes on the paradigm of communication and the difficulties and challenges faced by editors and researchers over time management. Read More →