Monthly Archives: May 2020

You are browsing the site archives by month.

[PINNED] COVID-19 publications on SciELO Preprints and SciELO Network journals

We prepared a list that includes the latest preprints available in SciELO Preprints and the most recent documents published by the SciELO Network journals about COVID-19. Access via SciELO Search. Read More →

Homemade cloth face masks as a barrier against respiratory droplets – systematic review [Originally published in Acta paul. enferm. vol.33]

Using cloth face masks provides a barrier against droplets when compared with not using any face masks. The face mask is an additional preventive mesuare and must be used along with respiratory etiquette, hand hygiene, social distancing, and isolation of cases. Image: Vera Davidova. Read More →

COVID-19 and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: How to manage it? [Originally published in Clinics, vol. 75]

Pediatric gastroenterologists, family members, and caregivers of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are on alert; they are all focused on implementing prophylactic measures to prevent infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, evaluating the risks in each patient, guiding them in their treatment, and keeping IBD in remission. Image: Vanessa Bucceri. Read More →

COVID-19 in solid organ transplantation patients: A systematic review [Originally published in Clinics, vol. 75]

We performed a systematic review of SOT patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The MEDLINE and PubMed databases were electronically searched and updated until April 20, 2020. The MeSH terms used were “COVID-19” AND “Transplant”. Image: Piron Guillaume. Read More →

How Institutions Can Protect the Mental Health and Psychosocial Well-Being of Their Healthcare Workers in the Current COVID-19 Pandemic [Originally published in Clinics, vol. 75]

Specialists estimate that the world will endure a long battle against the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. To ensure success, it is essential to keep our healthcare workers active, motivated, and healthy. Thus, we hereby recommend that all health institutions pay special attention to the mental health and psychosocial well-being of their workers. Image: Luke Jones. Read More →

Was postponing the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic games a correct decision? [Originally published in Rev Bras Med Esporte, vol.26 no.3]

Moreover, during the period planned for the games in 2020 the pandemic may be subsiding in some countries and increasing in others, and this was also taken into consideration as a risk factor. Hence, the decision taken to postpone the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games until 2021 due to the 2019-nCoV was the correct one, and was extremely important to protect the health of Olympic and Paralympic athletes, as well as spectators. Image: Erik Eastman. Read More →

COVID-19: challenges for a new epoch [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

Preparedness is crucial to reduce the health, economic, and social impacts of a future epidemic, it is also the only way to avoid the spread of other diseases. Pandemics are not aleatory events but are the consequence of human interactions with the environment and could be avoided or reduced through science and investments in health, education and transportation and improved through better conditions of living. Image: Lizzie Mayorga. Read More →

COVID-19 and acute pulmonary embolism: what should be considered to indicate a computed tomography pulmonary angiography scan? [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

Here, we present a case of a patient with COVID-19 who developed acute pulmonary embolism. Clinical and laboratory data and findings of non-enhanced CT indicate possibility of acute pulmonary embolism, and support the decision to proceed with computed tomography pulmonary angiography that can objectively identify filling defects in pulmonary arterial branches. Image: Martha Dominguez de Gouveia. Read More →

Spatiotemporal evolution of coronavirus disease 2019 mortality in Brazil in 2020 [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

In summary, Brazilian states with the greatest lack of health resources have shown the highest COVID-19 mortality rate. Inequalities in availability and access to the health care system represent additional challenges, given the increase in COVID-19 mortality in the country. This study reinforces the need for an urgent expansion of the operational capacity of the Unified Health System.
Image: Veit Hammer. Read More →

War economy and the COVID-19 pandemic: Inequalities in stimulus packages as an additional challenge for health systems [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

War economics refers to the set of exceptional economic measures taken during a certain period of time, generally defined by the existence of an armed conflict (war). It is characterized by the increase in public spending and centralization of economic guidelines within the scope of public power, which starts to dictate the economy’s mode of operation seeking to save it. War economics refers to the set of exceptional economic measures taken during a certain period of time, generally defined by the existence of an armed conflict (war). It is characterized by the increase in public spending and centralization of economic guidelines within the scope of public power, which starts to dictate the economy’s mode of operation seeking to save it. Image: newelement. Read More →

Individuals with covert severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection: Are they a critical booby-trap? [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

I believe that in Egypt, the first phase of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic was characterized by symptomless (covert) carriers. Covert carriers are individuals who test positive for the virus on laboratory testing but are symptomless and can shed the virus. Numerous researchers assume that there is an unobserved pool of these carriers because in many cases, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections could not be related to contact with persons with infection or to travel to epidemic areas. Read More →

Clinical characteristics and therapeutic procedure for a critical case of novel coronavirus pneumonia treated with glucocorticoids and non-invasive ventilator treatment [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

The novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) outbreak occurred in Wuhan, China at the end of 2019. Here, we report the clinical characteristics and therapeutic procedure for a case of severe NCP. The patient was started on glucocorticoids and non-invasive ventilator treatment. After treatment, the patient’s symptoms improved, and the status was confirmed as NCP negative. Our results may provide clues for the treatment of NCP. Image: Adhy Savala. Read More →

Surveillance of the first cases of COVID-19 in Sergipe using a prospective spatiotemporal analysis: the spatial dispersion and its public health implications [Originally published in Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop., vol. 53]

We performed a prospective space-time analysis using confirmed cases of COVID-19 during the first 7 weeks of the outbreak in Sergipe. The prospective space-time statistic detected “active” and emerging spatio-temporal clusters comprising six municipalities in the south-central region of the state. The Geographic Information System (GIS) associated with spatio-temporal scan statistics can provide timely support for surveillance and assist in decision-making. Image: Brian McGowan. Read More →

Laboratory medicine resilience during coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic [Originally published in J. Bras. Patol. Med. Lab., vol.56]

In vitro diagnostic testing has been a virtually innocent target of heavy, reiterated, often irrational cost-containment polices during the past decades, which have contributed to diminishing the availability of technical and human resources all around the world. Although working close to the “minimal level of survival” has hence become commonplace in the vast majority of laboratory services, the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic has triggered an unexpected and unprecedented universal crisis, which has rapidly overwhelmed the responsive capacity of the entire system of health care, thus also including laboratory diagnostics. Image: Michael Schiffer. Read More →

Diabetes and COVID-19: more than the sum of two morbidities [Originally published in Rev. Saúde Pública, vol.54]

We emphasized how the burden of these two morbidities in a middle income country has aggravated this pandemic scenario. The comprehension of this association and biological plausibility may help face this pandemic and future challenges. Image: Matt Chesin. Read More →