Tag: Bibliometrics

Bibliometric indicators of the European scientific production

Europe brings together many countries leaders in scientific and technological research and has encouraged cooperation programs between institutions, countries and regions to foster competitiveness, impact and relevance in research. A comprehensive study based on bibliometric indices analyzes the scientific output of the region and appraises its contribution to the realization of the European Research Area. Read More →

Project Making Data Count encourages sharing of research data

Sharing of research data (open data) is increasing in all areas related to scientific research, and it involves authors, journals, publishers, funding agencies, the productive sector and society. In order to encourage authors to provide and reuse datasets, it is paramount to find ways to measure their impact. The initiative ‘Making Data Count’ is efficiently doing this, find out how. Read More →

The use of research metrics is diversified in the Leiden Manifesto

Research evaluation in recent decades has been increasingly conducted through metrics and indicators, which are gradually replacing the assessment by peers. Researchers gathered at the 19th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2014) held in September 2014 in Leiden, Netherlands, in order to advise on the use of metrics in research assessment drafted a set of rules – the Leiden Manifesto. Know its guidelines. Read More →

Study analyzes the use of social networks in the assessment of scientific impact

The use of social networks in science communication has been increasing on a large scale, and specific platforms have been created for interaction and information sharing among researchers. A study by researchers at the University of St. Gallen, in Switzerland evaluated whether and how scientific impact can be measured by social media data analysis, and how this approach correlates to traditional metrics. Read More →

Article analyses saturation of peer reviewers

Online publication caused a significant increase in the number of journals and articles worldwide, but the number of researchers has not increased proportionately. Thus, the peer review process, which ensures quality and credibility to scientific articles, is saturated and as a result the quality of reviews is decreasing. Two articles in Nature address this issue, the first one proposes a hybrid model to evaluate the articles and the second reports an online service for registration and publication of reviews, in order to grant credit and recognition to the reviewers. Read More →

How do I get read and cited if I do not publish in elite-journals?

The citation impact of our articles largely depends largely on the promotion work we do of what we publish. Citations do not arise mechanically from the Impact Factor of the journal, but from our personal marketing. Read More →

Paper investigates: is your most cited work your best work?

A study reports research with the 400 most cited authors in biomedical sciences on their perception of their most cited articles published in 2005-2008. The authors were asked to score their ten most cited articles in six ways. The research aims to investigate whether the authors consider their most cited articles and answer questions such as: Science progresses mainly through evolution or revolution? The study has many interesting findings, however, instead of answering the questions, it brings even more interrogations. Read More →

Study proposes a taxonomy of motives to cite articles in scientific publications

Article examines the activity of citing publications during the process of writing a scientific paper. The suggested model consists of four main categories – Arguments, Social Alignment, Mercantile Alignment and Data – plus subcategories. The authors argue that the complexities of citation practice show how little can be assumed about the real reasons for citing an article by analyzing the final paper. The study has an impact mainly in attributing relevance to articles based solely on citations, and therefore, on journal and researcher assessment. Read More →

Rise of the Rest: The Growing Impact of Non-Elite Journals – Originally published on Google Scholar Blog on October 8, 2014

The world of scholarly communication has changed quite a bit over the last decade. This post from Google Scholar team explore the impact of these changes – looking at how scholarship and citation patterns have changed as publications and archives moved online and comprehensive relevance-ranked search became available to everyone. Read More →

What is the decline of the elite journals?

According to a study by Vincent Larivière of the Université de Montréal, there was an exponential increase in the number of articles published in the elite journals. However, it is now required twice the number of citations than in previous decades for an article to be in the top 5% with higher impact, and that these articles are distributed amongst a wider base of titles because authors have more independence in choosing where they publish. Read More →

Scientometrics of peer-reviewers – will they be finally recognized?

ORCID and CASRAI have initiated a project to establish a set of standard procedures to recognize the work of peer-reviewers. In this way the important work of peer-review, almost always anonymous, will be counted in the acknowledgments and be incorporated into scientometric indicators and altmetrics. But this will depend upon a sufficient level of adoption and acceptance of the procedures. Read More →

Why XML?

The XML structuring of full texts of all SciELO journals from 2015 ownwards represents a significant advance in the process of editing, publishing and interoperability of journals and the research they publish. With XML the process of quality control of the structure of the texts, their storage and retrieval in databases, exchange with other systems and display in different formats as well as in fixed and mobile reading devices will be more efficient. Read More →

SciELO Citation Index in the Web of Science

The SciELO Citation Index is now available in the WoS platform. It represents an important contribution to the development of the SciELO journals and is a leading edge solution to the issue of the international indexing of the journals, in particular to the counts of the citations received by the published articles. SciELO CI should be considered a standard to be used in the evaluation processes of agencies that support research and scholarly communication. Read More →

Interview with Vincent Larivière

Bibliometrics/Scientometrics is at the heart of information science and It is important to recall the various limitations of bibliometric indicators – warns Vincent Larivière. The journal Impact Factor provides a useful “holistic” indication of the relative position of a journal within a subfield. Most researchers outside Library and Information Science have no clue on its actual limitations! Read More →