Author: Lilian Nassi-calò

The challenges of retraction: cleaning up the literature might be difficult

There is consensus that misconduct in academic publications should be remedied as soon as possible. However, there are a number of implications – ethical, moral, legal and those related to the reputation of the journals and researchers in the retraction process – that turn the process into a complex one which can often become unworkable. Read More →

SciELO participates in the Global coalition supporting Creative Commons licenses to access journal articles

The STM International Association launched a series of new licensing models for open access contents. Its release caused a massive reaction from the scientific community and numerous organizations in the form of an open letter called Coalition Letter on STM Model Licenses, which so far gathered 83 organizations, including SciELO. The signatories understand that already established Creative Commons licenses cover a wide spectrum of possibilities, and that open access dispense new licenses. Read More →

Profile of researchers that integrate the core of world science publishing

A limited number of researchers all over the world can keep a continuous and uninterrupted flow of publications over time. This ability is shared by only 1% of researchers, who form the core of most productive and cited scientists. The inability to maintain this flow is translated into less scientific impact. Read More →

The Open Data movement: international consolidation

The open data movement – the availability of scientific research data for preservation, searching, using and citing – is gaining followers in all sectors of the academic world, and with editors, publishers, research institutions and funding agencies. The movement will allow greater interoperability, transparency, visibility and research impact, in addition to ensuring the digital preservation of the original data that would otherwise have a tendency to be lost or become inaccessible with the passage of time. Read More →

South America science in Nature

The celebrated journal Nature devotes a special section of its June 11 issue to an analysis of South American research output, highlighting areas of excellence and innovation which are internationally recognized, and fields of collaboration with other countries both inside and outside the region. The articles in this section stress the economic and infrastructural inequalities within the region, as well as the low levels of investment in research and development, and point to FAPESP as a successful model of investment directly linked to a state’s GDP. Read More →

Non-native English-speaking authors and editors evaluate difficulties and challenges in publishing in international journals

Due to linguistic and cultural barriers, authors in emerging economies have faced challenges in having their papers accepted in main stream journals. A study conducted on international editors and authors in non-English speaking countries shows that good research results can be prejudiced by poor writing and difficulties with the language. Read More →

The EU will centralize the registry of clinical trials

In April 2014, the European Union approved legislation regulating the registry of clinical trials. This will allow for transnational cooperation between laboratories and institutions of research. The measure will contribute to the transparency and dependability of the trials, and will also allow research into drugs for the treatment of rare diseases. The first registry of clinical trials was created by the WHO in 2004. Currently, registering clinical trials is mandatory in the majority of the countries. Read More →

Study highlights academic journal publication models in Brazil and Spain

Brazil and Spain have a commanding profile in academic output in their respective regions, and possess great potential in the field of scholarly publishing. Notwithstanding the differences in the history of scientific development between the two countries, both have a similar number of journals in the Web of Science database and have developed successful open access models. This article highlights a study carried out by researchers from those two countries and gives an outline of these programs and the reasons behind their success. Read More →

Developing countries headed by China are posing a threat to American dominance in science

Over the last decade, the USA has been losing ground to emerging economies in science and technology, particularly in Asia, according to a report produced by the National Science Board in 2014. Nevertheless, the country remains a leader in innovation which can have a substantial impact on the resumption of its economic growth. Many countries are developing technological capabilities and human capital in support of a knowledge-based economy, which will bring with it clear benefits for these nations. Read More →

Researchers reading habits for scientific literature

These days, researchers are finding themselves exposed to an avalanche of scientific information which is making it a constant challenge to select what is actually relevant and follow recent developments in a particular field. Studies show that for the first time in 35 years, researchers may have reached a plateau in their capacity to read articles and other sources of scientific information. The concept of reading may even be redefined over the course of time. Read More →

Reproducibility of research results: on-going initiatives

From Space Sciences to Clinical Medicine, different areas of knowledge are facing research results credibility problems. However, scientific societies, public health institutions and the private sector are engaged to curb this tendency. Those involved believe that increasing the transparency of data by way of publishing primary research data in open access repositories and promoting online forums for comments on published articles are promising initiatives. Read More →

Reproducibility of research results: the tip of the iceberg

Research on clinical trials with drugs under development is the foundation upon which pharmaceutical companies base the development of their new drugs, thus the reliability of the outcomes of this research is of utmost importance. However studies show that between 60% and 70% of this research may include irreproducible results. It is necessary that the parties involved become aware of the extent of the problem and join together to find a solution. Read More →

Reproducibility of research results: a subjective view

At a time when discussions about ethics in experimentation and scientific publication are going beyond laboratories and academic environments, and are peaking the interest of society as a whole, another threat is emerging to the credibility of science. Irreproducibility of research results is affecting the different areas of knowledge and is of concern to all. The pressure on researchers for positive and high impact outcomes is bound up with the natural desire of scientists to make groundbreaking discoveries, even if the evidence points to the contrary. Read More →

PubMed Commons: NLM launches pilot version of open comments on articles

The United States National Library of Medicine announced the implementation of the PubMed Commons, an innovative system that enables researchers to comment on published scientific papers, promoting a forum of discussion among peers. For the pilot phase, NIH and Wellcome Trust scientists were selected to test the initiative, along with invited colleagues. This system meets the worldwide trend to promote the open discussion of research results. Read More →

Controversial Article in The Journal “Science” exposes the weaknesses of Peer-Review in a set of Open Access Journals

Just before celebrating the Open Access Week worldwide, a controversial article published on Science exposed the recurrent question of the weaknesses of the peer review process in scientific communication. The paper focus on the selection of journals which collect article processing fees and describes how 304 versions of a fictitious article containing serious and obvious flaws were accepted in 157 open access journals, many already considered predatory. This post describes the experiment and gathers comments from international blogs. Read More →