Tag: Impact Factor

The myopia of bibliometric indicators

The use of bibliometric indicators in science evaluation is a ubiquitous practice, despite the fact that there is no unequivocal relationship between citations and scientific quality, impact or merit. A recent study showed that the indiscriminate use of these indicators may hinder the publication of innovative research results, delaying the development of science. Read More →

Openness is the only quality of an academic article that can be objectively measured

Quality of scientific research articles is a widespread preoccupation in academic circles. The most used proxy is based on citation counts, not of the article itself, but of the averages of articles appearing in the same journal during a given time window. This is known as the Journal Impact Factor, which may be objective within its own definition, but utterly lacks objectivity with regard to scientific quality of individual articles. Only some technical qualities of articles can be assessed at the time of their publication, and, significantly, their openness, the degree to which the research results they describe can be immediately and universally shared. Read More →

Are we in the GSM Radar?

Google Scholar Metrics (GSM) offers alternative metrics to the JCR Impact Factor and the SJR, namely the h-5 index. To enter this world ranking that covers more than 40,000 journals it is only necessary to publish an average of 20 articles per year and be cited. However, there are hundreds of journals (our journals) that are not being indexed in GSM. They’re off Radar. Read More →

In memoriam: Eugene Garfield – 1925-2017

The father of Scientometrics died at 91 years old on February 27, 2017 leaving a production of more than 1.000 papers and communications over 60 years of research. Read More →

Study assesses financing sources of open-access article processing charge

Is there a correlation between article processing charge (APC) and the journals’ Impact Factor? What are the funding sources for payment and how do they influence the choice of journals for publication? These and other questions were investigated by authors from Nanjing University, China and the results explain the peculiarity of open access in different countries. Read More →

Five things to consider when designing a policy to measure research impact [Originally published in The Conversation]

The move of the Australian government to measure the impact of university research on society introduces many new challenges that were not previously relevant when evaluation focused solely on academic merit. Read More →

How to assess research proposals?

The peer review of research proposals (grants) aims to judge the merit of projects and researchers and enable the best to be contemplated. The director of an institution in the United Kingdom shared on Twitter his struggle in evaluating the numerous proposals received and started a discussion forum from which ideas and suggestions emerged. Read More →

Study analyzes the use of social networks in the assessment of scientific impact

The use of social networks in science communication has been increasing on a large scale, and specific platforms have been created for interaction and information sharing among researchers. A study by researchers at the University of St. Gallen, in Switzerland evaluated whether and how scientific impact can be measured by social media data analysis, and how this approach correlates to traditional metrics. Read More →

How do I get read and cited if I do not publish in elite-journals?

The citation impact of our articles largely depends largely on the promotion work we do of what we publish. Citations do not arise mechanically from the Impact Factor of the journal, but from our personal marketing. Read More →

Internationalization of journals was the central topic of the 4th Annual SciELO Meeting

The extent of national and international dimensions as determinants of the performance of journals of Brazil dominated the program of the 4th Annual SciELO Meeting, held on December 2, at the FAPESP auditorium in São Paulo. Currently responsible for the communication of more than 25% of the national scientific production indexed internationally, the journals of Brazil influence the country’s international scientometric ranking, positively in number of articles and negatively in received citations per article. Read More →

Science and life: Interview – Tribute to Dr. Greene

Completing 80 years of life, Dr. Greene, professor, scientist and editor for more than 30 years awards us by sharing his knowledge and experience on issues that affect scholarly communication of Brazil in an interview given to the SciELO team. From an early age his interests were linked to research; his initial training was in Chemistry, followed later by Cell Biology. We encourage readers to share this experience. Read More →

Paper investigates: is your most cited work your best work?

A study reports research with the 400 most cited authors in biomedical sciences on their perception of their most cited articles published in 2005-2008. The authors were asked to score their ten most cited articles in six ways. The research aims to investigate whether the authors consider their most cited articles and answer questions such as: Science progresses mainly through evolution or revolution? The study has many interesting findings, however, instead of answering the questions, it brings even more interrogations. Read More →

The visibility of journals of Brazil

The increase in visibility of journals and the research they communicate is an expectation that permeates journals of quality, the policies and programs of funding agencies and, in particular, of the SciELO Program. Throughout its 16 years in operation, and always in partnership with the journals, SciELO achieved outstanding results that are reflected in the performance of the journals. SciELO plans important advances for the coming years, such as the increase in the percentage of articles in English, and by authors with foreign affiliation. Read More →

“10 years of research impact : the most cited articles in Scopus 2001 – 2011” – Synthesis of the article originally published in the Elsevier newsletter “Research Trends, Issue 38”

Gali Halevi and Henk Moed investigate what the most frequently cited articles were in Scopus from 2001-2011, in eight main research areas, and give their authors the chance to comment on their achievements. Read More →

Meeting considers how open access could address inequalities – Originally published in Research Information on October 19, 2014

Mark Patterson reports back from the COASP meeting that was held in Paris in September. The meeting presented a broad range of initiatives covering diverse geographical regions, subject areas and content types. The overarching sense was one of progress on a number of fronts, and the prospects for much greater change in the sphere of scholarly communication. Read More →